SilverBlog

Wisdom from our industry experts and our SilverLink magazine.

 
 

Author: Jill Aldredge

While looking through a stack of insurance contracts, you’ll likely notice that many include additional insured endorsements – unless you’re looking at workers’ compensation policies. These policies are intended to cover the insured’s employees. Adding an additional insured would require the policyholder to cover an owner or general contractor’s employees for work-related injuries. Therefore, this endorsement is not permitted for workers’ compensation coverage. This restriction has sparked a growing interest in something called the “alternate employer endorsement.”

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Self-driving. Autopilot. Lane assist. Self-braking. Semi-autonomous. Highly autonomous. Fully autonomous. These terms are all used to describe the automation of driving. As this technology becomes more sophisticated, it will likely lead to some major changes in the way we insure vehicles. Many people are beginning to speculate that it could even eliminate the need to obtain coverage for liability to third parties. It won’t be long before autonomous vehicles are everywhere on our roadways, so we have to wonder – could there be some truth to this growing suspicion?

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Getting hurt on the job can be a pain – in more ways than one. Expensive medical bills and lost time at work often follow serious injuries, making an already bad situation worse. Many states have a statute that requires employers with one or more employees to provide workers’ compensation coverage. Sometimes, however, states exempt certain employees from this mandate. For example, Nebraska exempts federal employees, railroad employees, most volunteers and casual workers, independent contractors, household domestic servants and some employees of agricultural operations. Exempting classes of workers from the statute does not mean that an employer can’t be held liable if an injury, illness or death occurs; it simply means that an employer is not subject to a state’s workers’ compensation law to insure those employees. It also means that those individuals are not restricted by the offerings of the workers’ compensation system and, in the event of injury, illness or death, they can sue the employer. If they can prove negligence, their potential payout could far exceed what the law would have allowed under the workers’ compensation policy.

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